The language of apples

Currently six weeks into a nine week holiday in the U.K. and Europe, it’s been interesting trying new foods in new countries.

Apple Travels

Right now I am in The Netherlands.  I don’t know much about apples here but they must grown as I know several recipes that originate here showcase apples – Dutch apple pie or tart (appeltaart) for instance.  Dutch apple pie, as I understand it, differs from regular apple pie in that it has raisins and lemon flavouring.
Apple Travels
I thought I might see quite different varieties of apples in shops and supermarkets throughout Europe but they’re essentially the same varieties we have at home: Granny Smith, Fuji, Pink Lady ….. I’d have to venture out into the villages and shop at roadside stalls to get some of the older varieties and without a car, that isn’t always possible.
Apple Travels
So I am settling for apple products ie Cider.  I have tried English, Scottish and Irish Apple Cider and they’ve all been very very good.  I attempted to ask for Cidre in France but offended the waiter so much he didn’t speak to us for the rest of the service which we found comical.  We did find Cidre in France at a different cafe so we were all good.
Apple Travels
The French do, however, make a delicious apple pastries.  I thought I might see apple ice cream, gelato or sorbet as they like to make use of fruits in their iced treats but so far (we’ve managed to have ice cream of some sort in every county) I’ve not seen any so Tasmania still reigns as the best apple ice cream producer.
Apple Travels
The other apple treat I have consumed in great quantity is apple juice, my go to favourite cold beverage.  I have had single variety apple juice, green apple juice, cloudy apple juice and they’ve all been really nice.
Apple Travels