Apples we are eating: Rockit

Rockit

Snooping around the crates of apples in the Supermarket to find something inspiring my eye passed over a stack of tubes with teeny-tiny apples in them.  I have seen these apple tubes in the past but never really paid much attention.  I assumed they were little apples of some sort – perhaps gala’s or something similar.
Rockit

This day, at the supermarket, I picked up the plastic tube to examine the apples more closely.  The tube is quite clearly marked with “Rockit – Your Daily Fruit Blast” but I assumed, incorrectly, that the Rockit was only referring to the tube shape.  In fact, upon reading the small-ish print on the reverse side of the rockit tube, the apples are identified as Rockit’s and a “natural taste sensation packed full of nutrition”.
Rockit

The plastic tube itself is an interesting choice with the move towards minimal packaging in recent times that would perhaps make a clear thin plastic container to hold five wee apples an unwise choice.   But these apples in a tube have been around since 2010 (I am a bit behind in this discovery) as they (the apple producers) won several NZ Food awards in that year so maybe the zero-packaging movement wasn’t quite as mainstream as it is now.  And the tube itself is marketed as being recyclable and the perfect shape to fit into a cup holder in your vehicle (or your baby/toddler’s vehicle/buggy) or a school bay or simply place on your office desk.
Rockit

The apples themselves are, as said already, teeny tiny, bite-sized.  Despite that, I quartered mine (a habit I developed as a teenager with an expensive metal smile).  The Rockit website states the apple has a “fantastic crisp crunch” – my apple is super crisp so either is a late apple or a good keeper or both.  There is not much info as to what the parentage of the apple is, just that it is a naturally cross bred miniature variety that has taken 20 years to develop.  Digging deeper under the original name of PremA96 I discover one of the parents is identified as Royal Gala, the other GS 2184 as well as lots of other scientific-y stuff I don’t understand.  The flavour is nice but not outstanding.  This is a sweet apple – it felt a little bit like I was eating an apple-lolly (in a good way).
Rockit

A tube of five apples isn’t cheap (they work out to be about $1.00 per apple at the time I purchased them) but most people wouldn’t blink at spending $1.00 on a chocolate or candy bar as a snack and these apples are so much more nutritious (the website gives nutritional data).  Due to them being so little – is one enough for a snack?  Depends on who the snacker is.  I’d probably send the whole tube off with just one of the BLP (bottomless pits) but for smaller children they are perfect.  I do remember apples coming home in lunch boxes with one or two bites out of them however I would just cut off the brown bits and dice the remaining apple into a batch of muffins so it wasn’t too much of an issue.  Once the empty-lunch-box-before-play rule came into place (I’m talking 10 years ago so I don’t know if they do this anymore) it was more of a problem as I knew the half eaten apples were tossed in the rubbish bin.
Rockit
Would I buy these apples again?
Texture and taste wise – yes, definitely.
Size wise – depends on the circumstance.
Packaging wise – I’d like the option of buying them without the tube.
Price wise – if the cheaper apples aren’t worth eating as they’re soft and mealy, then yes.  But while I can buy crisp crunchy Braeburn and Fuji, the Rockit will remain on the buy-occasionally list.

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